Image not available

Cárcamo JJ et al, 2011: Raman study of the shockwave effect on collagens

Cárcamo JJ, Aliaga AE, Clavijo RE, Brañes MR, Campos-Vallette MM
Laboratory of Vibrational Spectroscopy, Faculty of Sciences, University of Chile, PO Box 653, Santiago, Chile


Abstract

The Raman spectra (1800-200 cm(-1)) of isolated dried collagen types I and III were recorded at different times after shockwave (SW) application in aqueous media. SWs were applied in a single session. One week after the SW application the vibrational data analysis indicates changes in the conformation of the collagens; orientational changes are also inferred. During the next three weeks collagens tended to recover the conformation and orientation existing before SW application.

Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
Spectrochim Acta A Mol Biomol Spectrosc. 2012 Feb;86:360-5. doi: 10.1016/j.saa.2011.10.049. Epub 2011 Oct 25
PMID: 22079890 [PubMed - in process]

Rate this blog entry:
0
 

Comments 1

Othmar Wess on Thursday, 17 November 2011 00:00

Shock waves are not only used for stone fragmentation but for many different diseases such as chronic pelvic pain syndrome, chronic pain in general, pseudarthrosis, wound healing, cardiac diseases etc. The working mechanism for these diseases is poorly understood. The authors investigate the effect of shock waves on isolated dried collagen types I and III by Raman spectroscopy in vitro. Raman spectroscopy is well suited to characterize structural features of collagen as well as changes which might be due to shock wave application. Changes of Raman spectra could be shown to develop within one week after shock wave application returning to original values after three weeks. This observation may help to understand shock wave effects on collagen tissue and may lead the way towards future in vivo investigations.

Othmar Wess

Shock waves are not only used for stone fragmentation but for many different diseases such as chronic pelvic pain syndrome, chronic pain in general, pseudarthrosis, wound healing, cardiac diseases etc. The working mechanism for these diseases is poorly understood. The authors investigate the effect of shock waves on isolated dried collagen types I and III by Raman spectroscopy in vitro. Raman spectroscopy is well suited to characterize structural features of collagen as well as changes which might be due to shock wave application. Changes of Raman spectra could be shown to develop within one week after shock wave application returning to original values after three weeks. This observation may help to understand shock wave effects on collagen tissue and may lead the way towards future in vivo investigations. Othmar Wess
Guest
Sunday, 28 May 2017
STORZ MEDICAL AG
Lohstampfestrasse 8
8274 Tägerwilen
Switzerland
Tel.: +41 (0)71 677 45 45
Fax: +41 (0)71 677 45 05

www.storzmedical.com
Personal data
Address
Contact data
Message