STORZ MEDICAL – Literature Databases
STORZ MEDICAL – Literature Databases
Literature Databases
Literature Databases

Kallidonis P. et al., 2024: Use of artificial stones in training and laboratory studies, have we found the right material? Outcomes of a systematic review from the European School of Urology.

Kallidonis P, Peteinaris A, Veneziano D, Pietropaolo A, Pagonis K, Adamou C, Vagionis A, Al-Aown A, Liatsikos E, Somani B.
Department of Urology, University Hospital of Rion, Patras, Greece.
Department of Urology and Kidney Transplant, Grande Ospedale Metropolitano, Reggio Calabria, Italy.
School of Medicine, Hofstra Northwell University, New York, USA.
Department of Urology, University Hospital Southampton NHS Foundation Trust, Southampton, UK.
5Department of Urology, Armed Forces Hospital Southern Region, Khamis Mushait, Saudi Arabia.
6Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria.

Abstract

Objective: In this review, we investigated the current literature to find out which artificial stones (AS) are available in endourology, and in which experimental and training schemes they are used.

Materials and methods: A systematic review was performed according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses statement. Twenty-one out of 346 studies met our inclusion criteria and are presented in the current review. The inclusion criteria were the existence of AS and their use for laboratory and training studies.

Results: There is a wide variety of materials used for the creation of AS. BegoStone powder (BEGO USA, Lincoln, Rhode Island) and plaster of Paris™ were used in most of the studies. In addition, Ultracal-30 (U. S. Gypsum, Chicago, IL) was also used. Other materials that were used as phantoms were AS created from plaster (Limbs and Things, UK), standardized artificial polygonal stone material (Chaton 1028, PP13, Jet 280; Swarovski), model stones consisting of spheres of activated aluminum (BASF SE, Ludwigshafen am Rhein, Deutschland), Orthoprint (Zhermack, Badia Polesine, Italy), and a combination of plaster of Paris, Portland cement, and Velmix (calcium sulfate powder). Many experimental settings have been conducted with the use of AS. Our research demonstrated nine studies regarding testing and comparison of holmium: yttrium-aluminum-garnet laser devices, techniques, and settings. Six studies were about extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy testing and settings. Three experiments looked into treatment with percutaneous nephrolithotomy. Additionally, one study each investigated imaging perioperatively for endourological interventions, stone bacterial burden, and obstructive uropathy.

Conclusion: AS have been used in a plethora of laboratory experimental studies. Independent of their similarity to real urinary tract stones, they present a tremendous potential for testing and training for endourological interventions.

Urol Ann. 2024 Jan-Mar;16(1):43-51. doi: 10.4103/ua.ua_112_22. Epub 2023 Nov 15.
PMID: 38415239 FREE PMC Article

0
 

Comments 1

Peter Alken on Monday, 03 June 2024 11:00

Good basic information. Only 6 of 21 reviewed papers dealt with ESWL. The question asked in the title is not specifically answered. However, the answer seems to be when looking at the conclusion in abstract and text.

Peter Alken

Good basic information. Only 6 of 21 reviewed papers dealt with ESWL. The question asked in the title is not specifically answered. However, the answer seems to be when looking at the conclusion in abstract and text. Peter Alken
Friday, 12 July 2024