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Mager R. et al., 2021: Outcomes for Geriatric Urolithiasis Patients aged ≥80 Years Compared to Patients in Their Seventies.

Mager R, Brauers C, Kurosch M, Dotzauer R, Borgmann H, Haferkamp A.
Department of Urology and Pediatric Urology, University Medical Center Mainz, Mainz, Germany.
Department of Urology and Pediatric Urology, University Medical Center Mainz, Mainz, Germany.

Abstract

Background: Demographic changes are leading to an increase in geriatric urolithiasis patients aged ≥70 yr. Published data regarding their management remain sparse. In particular, for the subgroup of patients aged ≥80 yr there is a lack of evidence supporting the hypothesis that stone-removing treatment is effective, safe, and beneficial.

Objective: To examine the efficiency and safety of stone-removing treatment in geriatric urolithiasis patients aged ≥80 yr compared to their younger geriatric counterparts aged 70-79 yr against the background of their respective life expectancy.

Design, setting, and participants: Data for the study cohort were extracted from an institutional review board-approved retrospective database with 325 patients aged ≥70 yr (70-79 yr: n = 241; ≥80 yr: n = 84) consecutively admitted to hospital because of symptomatic urolithiasis from 2013 to 2018.

Outcome measurements and statistical analysis: Baseline characteristics, outcome and follow-up data, and survival were compared using Wilcoxon-Mann-Whitney U tests, χ2 tests, Kaplan-Meier estimation, log-rank tests, and Cox regression.

Results and limitations: At baseline, the incidence of infected hydronephrosis was greater among patients aged ≥80 yr (p < 0.05), whereas the median stone burden and Charlson comorbidity index did not differ between the groups. Outcome analysis revealed no significant differences in terms of complication, stone-free, and 6-mo readmission rates (p > 0.05). Survival analysis for the two groups demonstrated a 2-yr overall survival (OS) rate of 0.91 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.75-1) for patients aged ≥80 yr and 0.97 (95% CI 0.88-1), for those aged 70-79 yr (p < 0.01). Multivariable Cox analysis revealed age ≥80 yr (hazard ratio [HR] 3.3, 95% CI 1.3-8.5) and infected hydronephrosis (HR 2.8, 95% CI 1.0-7.8) as predictors of all-cause mortality (p < 0.05). The study is limited by its retrospective design.

Conclusions: Stone-removing treatment for patients aged ≥80 yr proved to be as effective and safe as for patients in their seventies. Although characterized by shorter remaining life expectancy, excellent 2-yr OS for patients aged ≥80 yr supports the hypothesis of equal benefit from stone-removing treatment when compared to septuagenarians.

Patient summary: There is a lack of evidence supporting the benefit of urinary stone-removing treatment for patients older than 80 yr. Our study included geriatric patients older than 70 yr with symptomatic urinary stone disease for which urinary drainage or stone removal is indicated. We compared treatment outcomes and survival between two age groups: patients aged 70-79 yr and those aged 80 yr or older. We found equivalent outcomes for the two groups and excellent 2-yr overall survival of 91% for those older than 80 yr. The study strengthens the evidence that active stone-removing therapy is safe and beneficial for these patients.
Eur Urol Focus. 2021 Aug 25:S2405-4569(21)00219-4. doi: 10.1016/j.euf.2021.08.004. Online ahead of print. PMID: 34454851

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Comments 1

Hans-Göran Tiselius on Monday, 10 January 2022 09:15

In this report the authors compared retrospectively active stone removal in patients aged ≥80 and in those 70-79. There is no information, however, on which ground the treatment modality was selected.

https://www.storzmedical.com/images/blog/Mager.JPG

From an SWL point of view this report is of limited interest. There are two factors, however, that have influenced the selection of stone removing procedures: higher occurrence of infected hydronephrosis and more common anticoagulation in patients ≥80.
The basic conclusion was that active stone removal was safe and successful in old patients

Hans-Göran Tiselius

In this report the authors compared retrospectively active stone removal in patients aged ≥80 and in those 70-79. There is no information, however, on which ground the treatment modality was selected. [img]https://www.storzmedical.com/images/blog/Mager.JPG[/img] From an SWL point of view this report is of limited interest. There are two factors, however, that have influenced the selection of stone removing procedures: higher occurrence of infected hydronephrosis and more common anticoagulation in patients ≥80. The basic conclusion was that active stone removal was safe and successful in old patients Hans-Göran Tiselius
Saturday, 18 May 2024