STORZ MEDICAL – Literature Databases
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Safdari A. et al., 2024: Effect of acupressure on pain intensity and physiological indices in patients undergoing extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy: a randomized double-blind sham-controlled clinical trial.

Safdari A, Khazaei S, Biglarkhani M, Mousavibahar SH, Borzou SR.
Student Research Committee, Hamadan University of Medical Sciences, Hamadan, Iran.
Department of Epidemiology, Research Center for Health Sciences, Hamadan University of Medical Sciences, Hamadan, Iran.
Department of Persian Medicine, School of Medicine, Hamadan University of Medical Sciences, Hamadan, Iran.
Urology & Nephrology Research Center, Hamadan University of Medical Sciences, Hamadan, Iran.
Department of Medical Surgical Nursing, School of Nursing and Midwifery, Chronic Diseases (Home Care) Research Center, Hamadan University of Medical Sciences, Hamadan, Iran.

Abstract

Background: Despite the widespread use of extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) as a treatment for kidney stones, it is essential to apply methods to control pain and improve patient comfort during this procedure. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate the effect of acupressure at the Qiu point on pain intensity and physiological indices in patients undergoing ESWL.

Methods: This randomized, sham-controlled clinical trial was conducted at the Shahid Beheshti Educational-medical Center in Hamadan City (western Iran) from May to August 2023. Seventy-four eligible patients were split into intervention (n = 37) and sham (n = 37) groups. Ten minutes before lithotripsy, the intervention group received acupressure at the Qiu point, while the sham group received touch at a neutral point. The primary outcomes were pain intensity measured by the Visual Analog Scale (VAS) and physiological indices such as blood pressure and heart rate at baseline, 1, 10, 20, 30, 40, and 50 min after the intervention. The secondary outcomes included lithotripsy success and satisfaction with acupressure application.

Results: The analysis of 70 patients showed no significant differences in the demographic and clinical information of the patients across the two groups before the study (P > 0.05). Generalized estimating equations revealed that the interaction effects of time and group in pain and heart rate were significant at 30 and 40 min (P < 0.05). The results of this analysis for systolic blood pressure revealed a significant interaction at 30 min (P = 0.035). However, no significant interaction effects were found for diastolic blood pressure changes (P > 0.05).

Conclusions: Acupressure at the Qiu point positively impacts pain in patients undergoing ESWL treatment and increases their satisfaction. However, these results for physiological indices require further studies. Thus, acupressure can be considered a simple, easy, and effective option for pain management in patients during this procedure.

BMC Complement Med Ther. 2024 Jan 25;24(1):55. doi: 10.1186/s12906-024-04360-1. PMID: 38273233 FREE PMC ARTICLE

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Comments 1

Hans-Göran Tiselius on Friday, 14 June 2024 11:00

The use of acupressure (massage) to the Qui point is presented as an alternative method to treat pain during SWL.
It is difficult to read out from the report exactly how effective the acupressure method is. Notably, the success of SWL with the given stone size was lower than expected with only 31% of the stones successfully treated in the acupressure group. In the sham group the corresponding level was 35%. In both situations that outcome also included 4 mm residual fragments.
The Qui point was unknown to me, but according to the description it is a point somewhere in the costovertebral angle. Moreover, it is the reviewer’s understanding that this point was subjected to powerful massage before SWL.

Hans-Göran Tiselius

The use of acupressure (massage) to the Qui point is presented as an alternative method to treat pain during SWL. It is difficult to read out from the report exactly how effective the acupressure method is. Notably, the success of SWL with the given stone size was lower than expected with only 31% of the stones successfully treated in the acupressure group. In the sham group the corresponding level was 35%. In both situations that outcome also included 4 mm residual fragments. The Qui point was unknown to me, but according to the description it is a point somewhere in the costovertebral angle. Moreover, it is the reviewer’s understanding that this point was subjected to powerful massage before SWL. Hans-Göran Tiselius
Friday, 12 July 2024