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Cift A. et al., 2020: Effect of Different Musical Types on Patient's Relaxation, Anxiety and Pain Perception during Shock Wave Lithotripsy: A Randomized Controlled Study

Çift A, Benlioglu C.
Department of Urology, Faculty of Medicine, Adıyaman University, Adıyaman, Turkey.
Department of Urology, Faculty of Medicine, Adıyaman University, Adıyaman, Turkey.

Abstract

PURPOSE: The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of listening to different music types during extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (SWL) on the patients' pain control, anxiety level, and satisfaction.

MATERIALS AND METHODS: This study was a prospective single-blinded, paral-lel-group randomized clinical trial with balanced ran-domization [1:1]. A total of 150 patients who underwent first-session SWL were included in the study. The patients were randomly divided in to five groups (30 participants in each group) as follows: headphones were not put on and no music was played in Group 1 (control group); headphones were put on but no music was played in Group 2; Turkish art music was listened to with headphones in Group 3; Western classical music was listened to with headphones in Group 4; thetype of music the patient liked was listened to with headphones in Group 5. Demographic data related to patients and procedure, State-Trait Anxiety Inventory-State Anxiety (STAI-SA), Visual Analog Scale (VAS) scores, willingness to repeat procedure (0: never 4: happily), and patient satisfaction rates (0: poor 4: excellent) were recorded immediately after the procedure.

RESULTS: There was a statistically significant difference between groups in terms of median VAS scores (7, 6, 4.5, 5, and 4, respectively, P<.001), whereas the VAS scores in Groups 3, 4, and 5 were significantly lower than those in Group 1 and 2 (P<.001). The median STAI-SA scores between the groups were significantly different (45, 45, 42, 45, and 40, respectively, P<.001), while the anxiety levels in Groups 3, 4, and 5 were significantly lower than those in Group 1 (P=.008, P=.018, and P<.001, respectively). Moreover, there were statistically significant differences between the groups in terms of willingness to repeat the procedure and patient satisfaction rates (P<.001).

CONCLUSIONS: Music therapy during SWL reduced the patients' pain and anxiety scores, moreover listening to the patient's preferred music type provided greater satisfaction. Listening to the patient's preferred music type could be standardized and routinely used during SWL.
Urol J. 2020 Jan 26;17(1):19-23. doi: 10.22037/uj.v0i0.5333.

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Comments 1

Peter Alken on Friday, July 03 2020 08:24

This is the first publication of the two authors on ESWL and I could not find any other publication of the department on ESWL.
In this study “Medication was not administered to any patient in any group before or during the procedure.”
I guess that the patients of this series are not the first one the authors have treated. Thus the authors must have known before their study how their patients reacted on ESWL without pain medication which is demonstrated in the results: The willingness of the patients to repeat the procedure was scaled between 0 and 4, 0 meaning never again and 4: happily again.
“... there were statistically significant differences between the groups in terms of willingness to repeat the procedure and patient satisfaction rates (P less than .001), whereas these parameters were significantly higher in Groups 3, 4, and 5 than in Group 1 (P less than .001). In addition, the willingness to repeat the procedure and patient satisfaction rates in Group 5 were significantly higher than those in Groups 3 and 4 ((P = .005 and P less than .001), (P = .007 and P = .003), respectively)”
From a mere statistical point of view it is somehow difficult to find out if putting on head phones only would have done the job. But the two most serious questions are why the authors have treated their patients without pain medication and how an ethic committee under these conditions could agree to a prospective study without pain medication. Did nobody listen to the patients complains before the study was done?

Peter Alken

This is the first publication of the two authors on ESWL and I could not find any other publication of the department on ESWL. In this study “Medication was not administered to any patient in any group before or during the procedure.” I guess that the patients of this series are not the first one the authors have treated. Thus the authors must have known before their study how their patients reacted on ESWL without pain medication which is demonstrated in the results: The willingness of the patients to repeat the procedure was scaled between 0 and 4, 0 meaning never again and 4: happily again. “... there were statistically significant differences between the groups in terms of willingness to repeat the procedure and patient satisfaction rates (P less than .001), whereas these parameters were significantly higher in Groups 3, 4, and 5 than in Group 1 (P less than .001). In addition, the willingness to repeat the procedure and patient satisfaction rates in Group 5 were significantly higher than those in Groups 3 and 4 ((P = .005 and P less than .001), (P = .007 and P = .003), respectively)” From a mere statistical point of view it is somehow difficult to find out if putting on head phones only would have done the job. But the two most serious questions are why the authors have treated their patients without pain medication and how an ethic committee under these conditions could agree to a prospective study without pain medication. Did nobody listen to the patients complains before the study was done? Peter Alken
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Thursday, October 29 2020

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